As An Act of Protest (a Scene) | The New Engagement

As An Act of Protest (a Scene)

As An Act of Protest (a Scene)

By LeRoy Kangalee

"The Rooftop Scene" from "As An Act of Protest," a Feature Film

"As An Act of Protest" is "an internal 'Battle of Algiers'" (Rudolph Lewis).  It is a cinematic poem about racism and its psychological effects.  It is an avant-garde movie that is more like a classical theater piece rather than a foray into conventional narrative cinema, and its style flows from documentary and melodrama to satire and horror.  The movie follows the "rite-of-passage-stations-of-the-cross" journey of a young, passionate, apollonian African American actor named Cairo Medina and his early artistic trials and tribulations with his director and dionysiac kindred spirit, Abner Sankofa.  Together, after leaving a NYC Theater conservatory, they form a theatre group in Harlem and try to revive the Black Arts Movement which had such an impact on the theater community in the 1960's.  However, after years of doing productions and protest plays, Cairo begins to question his role as an actor and the artist’s seemingly futile contributions and dwindling impact in an ever increasing oppressive, hypocritical, and apathetic world.  The terrain around Cairo, too, seems to be full of inner contradiction because New York City seems to have become the bastion of police brutality against black men.  The Mayor of NYC denies the insidious racism of his police officers when Cairo's brother is murdered by two policemen.  After a series of dissolved relationships, betrayals, and confrontations with the system, Cairo is pushed over the line from which there can be no retreat.  The film ends traumatically with a comment on racism and the violence that it breeds and the unfortunate, tragic, never ending cycle of hate, prejudice, and ignorance of history and "original sin" with which America must come to terms.

See more scenes at https://aaaopfilm.wordpress.com

 

Rooftop Scene from "As An Act of Protest"

Writer, Director, & Editor:  Dennis Leroy Kangalee

Starring: Che Ayende, The Last Poets, Ward Nixon, Dennis Leroy Kangalee

Original Score: Michael Wimberly

On-Line Editor: Pascal Raymond & Isaiah Singer

Director of Photography: Mark Banning

Art Director: Angie Saidel

144 Minutes (Full Feature Runtime)

2001

The Collection

Follow Us

"You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive."
~ James Baldwin

Help us spread the ethos of compassion and understanding by joining our social media networks and sharing generously!

Recent Literature

Fiction, Poetry, Essays, Drama

Moral Imperfections story art
Moral Imperfections

The will to achieve grace is within reach.

Slightly Higher God story art
Slightly higher god

The effort to find redemption in the ignoble is great.

Melancholia Review art
A Necessary Everyman: A Book Review of Roberto Carlos Garcia’s "Melancolia"

A rigorous and affectionate review of Roberto Carlos Garcia’s poetry collection, “Melancholia.”

La Baleine story art
la baleine

A one-way epistolary reveals a deepening longing for cohesion.

Story Art
HIJAB - A Love Story

Culture and comedy duet on the morning after a romantic tryst.

Chapters 7-9 of The Gift, story art
The Gift, Chapters 9 - 11

In chapters 9-11 of Mark Elzey’s revelatory memoir, the narrator faces the defacers.

Cracked Looking Glass, a Collection

As the vantage point shifts, the viewer is deconstructed.

The Gift, Chapter 8

The speaker takes aim at pop psychology, the notion of inferiority complexes, and Chicago’s heinous “Ugly Laws.”

The Flames they Rise and Fall

The memories threaten to cling and capture, but the rolling stone dodges all confinements.

Tender Bottoms, a Collection

Domesticating the Queer Cat.

Letters to the Black Woman

A scholarly and thoughtful epistolary celebrating black female identity and inventorying the rousing literature it produces.

Hamlets

An inquiry into the enduring power of Shakespeare’s classic opens the castle gates to a battalion of existential musings.

Enter the Kingdom

The apocalypse has never been delivered with such harrowing eloquence.

Jitters

Critters. Commitments. Whatever the pest, it gets under the skin.

Necessary Excoriations, a Collection

Pick a fight, vent a gripe; never let an incisive judgment get away.

The Gift, Chapter 7

Conditions are placed on relationships and ideals of acceptable appearance are carelessly imposed.

The Cummelier

Autoeroticism silences a stirred and sensitive soul.

An Interview with Father Adolfo Nicolas

A sacred folly. A farcical sacrifice.

In The Beginning - The Foundation of First Love

Yearning and wrenching, the heart twitches and beats harder.

The Ants

The ardent toil of a tiny colony fills a lumberjack with fascination, admiration, and self-reflection.

The Caress

The power of touch sends a young queer man aquiver with hot thoughts and boundless lust.

Dr. Burundanga

A profile in the shape of a case study probes the decaying and methodical mind of a misogynistic sociopath in a story written by a seasoned clinical psychologist.

Death Before Beauty

Astronomy, David Bowie, Italian ancestry, the 2016 Election, and the bond between a man and his deceased father blend and surge.

The Gift, Chapter 6

A bridge between bigotries is built and the memoirist finds a life-altering clarity in his prejudice.

Sundew

A Delicate Balance: Exploratory sex brings about an ascension in a lesbian relationship.

Veiled Voices story art
Veiled Voices

Unresolved, uncertain, and untrusting, the chasm grows.

The Prisoner I & II

War makes men monsters and monsters men.

The Little Lumberjack

Will, when coupled with grit, goes a long way.

The Gift Chapter 5 art
The Gift, Chapter 5

This installment of Mark Elzey’s autobiography brings the reader through an interminable and harrowing string of childhood corrective surgeries for the sake of “normalization”.

Millicent Gardens story art
Millicent Gardens, 1936

Humiliation and desperation/ community and aspiration.

The New Engagement

The New Engagement endeavors a novel approach to discovering, introducing, and showcasing writers, artists, and filmmakers, by providing them digital and print platforms, while encouraging and supporting their social-consciousness.